Florida’s 20-step Workers’ Compensation Exemption Process

The process for an owner of a company to get themselves properly excluded from a workers compensation insurance policy in Florida is quite cumbersome. In fact, owners not becoming properly excluded is one of the leading causes of workers’ compensation audit balances in the state of Florida. In Florida, an officer or LLC Member can only be excluded if they have a properly filed a Florida workers comp exemption form on file with the state. This can be done in two ways: 1) Complete a form by hand, get a notary signature, and mail the form to the proper Division of Workers Compensation office; or 2) Complete the online version of the form.

Florida workers comp exemption

The handwritten option is not overly reliable. Any errors on the form or if it is sent to the wrong office can cause the form to not be filed. In this circumstance the owner ends up getting included on the policy and will owe additional premium.  The online form is the best solution, even though the process is cumbersome and detailed. That’s why I’ve created this 20-step process for an insured to follow to make sure the officers are properly excluded.

1. Go to Sunbiz.org

2. Use the Document Searches Tab to find your Corporation or LLC. It is best to use the Tax ID

3. Make sure the business is in Active status. If not, correct this with the secretary of state before filing your exemption.

4. Your information inputted for your exemption must match Sunbiz. Therefore it is important to have this information handy.

5. For online filing use the link below. Otherwise use the paper form (input form number)

https//apps.fldfs.com/bocexempt/

6. Click the Apply for or Renew an Exemption button

7. Agree to Terms and Use a Pin to access in the future.

8. Section 1:

a. Applicant Name – Name of the person who is being excluded

b. Drivers License Number – select the correct state

c. Last 4 of Social

d. E-mail address – this is not required but helpful

9. Section 2:

a. Select Construction or Non-Construction

b. Select Either an Officer or Member of LLC

10. Section 3: Important to have your Sunbiz paperwork for this

a. Enter all information as listed on Sunbiz. Do Not Mis-Spell

b. Select a Scope of Business from the drop down menu. This is your main workers compensation class code with a 0 in front of the 4 digit code.

11. Section 4:

a. Input the document number listed on Sunbiz

12. Section 5

a. Either complete or check mark the “not applicable” box.

13. Section 7

a. Input other company info the applicant is an officer for

– This does NOT mean that the exemption is registered for each entity. You MUST enter the exemption information for EACH entity the owner is connected with. A separate application is required for each Tax Id.

14. Section 8

a. Verify this is correct

15. Section 9 –

a. Input workers compensation carrier name

16. Section 10

a. Input Name & Drivers License

17. Hit Continue

18. Hit Submit – there is a submit button after you hit continue

19. Processing Time – It generally takes 3-5 business days to process. Check back on the Florida Proof of Coverage website until it shows as registered.

20. If the Application is Rejected – Use the register website above, Click “Modify Application”, input your Pin and correct the problem. Best to contact the Florida Division of Workers Compensation and ask why the application was rejected so you know what to correct. 850-413-1609 option 2

Notes

Most exemptions are only active for 2 years. The exemption must be renewed by re-entering the information online.

Construction exemptions require a payment of $50

It’s very important to check back on the status of the exemption. Several times when registering for exemptions my clients have not received communication and the application didn’t process.

Spelling everything exactly like listed on Sunbiz is VERY IMPORTANT

Are you paying too much for Workers Comp or too much for Payroll? Maybe Both

 

Have you ever purchased a used car or found a great deal on a piece of used furniture at a “sale”?  Than got home to find out it was not the steal you thought when writing the check. Buying commercial insurance can sometimes be this way. It can be a stressful and time-consuming process, especially if you do not have an experienced insurance agent on your side. A good insurance agent can help you find things you might be overpaying for, or maybe some parts of your insurance policy are not set up right at all.

 

For example, I recently worked with a client who’s business is in a high risk agriculture industry. They pay a significant amount on their workers’ compensation insurance each year. This business was part of an alternate service organization, which provided payroll services. It than reports the payroll to their workers’ compensation carrier for the companies Pay-as-You-Go reporting. This was two separate companies doing these processes.

 

In the case of this business we found the workers’ compensation rates were a little high. So to help this business we found a carrier who could save them money on their workers comp coverage. We also found their payroll reporting charges were very high. In this business there are lots of companies that provide work comp and Payroll services. both services. Most of these agencies can offer a better rate because they are getting both businesses. Some try to charge lower workers comp rates, but make up the difference by charging more for the payroll processing side of things or vice versa.  Sometimes it is just that a payroll company knows they can build in a little extra that ends up costing you a lot!

 

For this business we were able to find an aggressive workers’ compensation carrier that provided competitive workers comp rates.  This carrier also integrated their payroll services and collected on a Pay-As-You-GO billing plan. By combining the two services, we were able to save this client nearly $25,000 per year on their work comp premiums and $23,000 per year on their payroll processing. Part of this savings was based on the payroll being reported by a company different than the insurance carrier. This disconnect can cause inaccurate reporting. Many companies work with agencies who actually operate the payroll service in house. They do this with the insurance carrier operations to make this fully integrated. This process also helps prevent fraud by acting as an extra verification procedure.

 

There are a lot of solutions out there for getting coverage in place.  If you can get workers compensation in place on a hard to write class code and get it on a pay-as-you-go basis, it seems like a dream come true.  However, this is an example of how just looking at the down payment or the workers comp rates alone can end up costing your company significantly. It’s always best to review the rates you are paying for this type of plan.  Review what is being charged for all the services provided. Sometimes this is where another company is really making their margin at your expense.

Business Income Coverage

Business Income Coverage

If you are thinking about adding business income coverage or would like to learn more about why you have it, let me start by defining what Business Income Coverage. According to The Insurance Risk Management Institute, business income coverage is commercial property insurance covering loss of income suffered by a business when damage to its premises by a covered cause of loss causes a slowdown or suspension of its operations. Coverage applies to loss suffered during the time required to repair or replace the damaged property. It may also be extended to apply to loss suffered after completion of repairs for a specified number of days. Business income coverage is also referred to as business interruption coverage.

Now that we have defined business income coverage, lets look at how it works.  This coverage is designed to cover what your business lost. Not the businesses total revenue. What is typically covered under this policy is profits, fixed costs, temporary locations, extra expenses, civil authority and few other areas like training cost. Most policies will have a standard 72 hr waiting period before coverage begins. You may be able to modify this if you talk to your agent. They can a;ways check with carriers for additional options to expedite this process. The period of restoration ends when property should be repaired or replaced within a reasonable time-frame. This is in comparison to a similar quality and type of business as yours to either repair the facility or move to a new location.

Business income amounts are determined by comparing historical net income with actual net income during the period of business interruption. The loss is the difference between the net income that would have been earned under normal business conditions and the net profit or loss that has occurred during the period of restoration. Lets say after repairs have been completed that the business is still not generating the business it would have prior to the loss. You can add extended business income coverage to you policy for up to 60 days. For example if your business resumes and income is still below normal amounts then extended business income would pay the difference for that time period.

Also, business income coverage will cover what is called extra expenses. This part of the coverage is for the cost to rent a temporary office space, lease computers or office machines, and installation of new equipment during the period of restoration. Just like business income, this is limited to the 12 months from the date of loss. The time limits on business income may seem like they are not long enough, but according to industry studies most businesses who don’t have this coverage do not reopen their doors.

Business income and extra expense is designed to help you through an uncontrollable event. Within the coverage of most policies it can prevent you from losing key staff members that otherwise would leave to find other employment due to the loss of a paycheck. This is a basic snapshot of the coverage for you to get a grasp of what it can do for your business. In most cases this coverage is already a part of your BOP policy. Many business owner’s look at it and think this could never effect their business, but in reality it can save your company. It will benefit certain types of businesses more than others, but it can help everyone. Retail Stores, Medical Offices, Restaurants, or anyone that operates out of an office location where customers come to you need this coverage. Contractors can also benefit from this coverage, but it is not as critical as locations where customers come to them to generate business.

 

 

Types of Business Insurance

The other day I was going through my emails at work and I notice something that I hadn’t really noticed before. In the past couple months, I have received numerous emails from clients asking what different insurance policies cover and what additional coverage they need. After replying to each individual email, I came up with the great idea to create a template that briefly explains the different kind of business insurance policies a business owner might need.

 

What Types of Business Insurance Are Available?

The main types of business insurance you should consider include:

  • Property and Casualty Insurance: Property insurance covers the physical location of the business (even if it is rented or leased) and its contents from things like fire, theft, flood, and earthquakes—although read the terms carefully to make sure they include everything you need. Casualty insurance, on the other hand, covers the operation of the business, but the two are usually grouped together in policies.
  • Commercial Auto Insurance: Commercial auto insurance covers your business for loss or damage to vehicles used by your business and for damage to others caused by your business vehicles. Note that vehicles used for business are not covered under your personal auto insurance policy even if a vehicle is used for both business and personal purposes.
  • Liability Insurance: Liability insurance covers you in the event someone sues you for negligence, which can occur, for instance, if someone falls on your property.
  • Product Liability Insurance: Product liability insurance covers your business for damages caused by a product designed, supplied, or manufactured by your business.
  • Business Interruption Insurance: Business interruption insurance can make up for lost cash flow and profits incurred because of an event that has interrupted your normal business operations.
  • Health Insurance: Health insurance provides health coverage for you and your employees.
  • Life and Disability Insurance: Life and disability insurance covers your business in the event of the death or disability of key owners, partners, or employees.
  • Workers’ Compensation Insurance: If you have employees, you must, by law, participate in workers’ compensation programs; workers’ compensation insurance covers employees if they are injured on the job.

 

            I get it! Trying to find the perfect coverage at an affordable price is extremely difficult. If you are a new business owner or even a business owner who hasn’t gotten any insurance before, it can be complicated. Not knowing what each term means in a policy is frustrating. That is why I provided a brief description of the basic policies that business owners frequently purchase. Never be scared to call a professional and ask them for more advice. And always make sure you are reading the exclusion page on your policy. You want to make sure you are properly covered for your job. The last thing you want is for something to happen, and realize something isn’t covered under your policy.

Ride Sharing and Auto Insurance

Our country is dealing with some phenomenon’s that we have never experienced before and its causing some big changes in the insurance business.  Not all insurance companies have caught up to the technological advances of Drones, Driverless Cars and Ride Sharing or “Transportation Network Companies” as states are now referring to now.

Drones and Driverless cars are going to have to be an article for another day. For now, companies like Uber and Lyft are quickly changing how Americans get around. They both offer an opportunity for individuals to make money off their personal vehicle by giving others a ride for a fee. Ride sharing is a trend that is developing into a major industry that insurance companies and state lawmakers have quickly had to adjust to. Most states are opening up to this, some more openly than others as you would expect and the same goes with insurance companies.

 

What does Ride sharing have to do with Insurance?

Most personal auto policies are going to exclude business use from coverage on your policy. Many carriers have “business use” as an option, however it is important to know what that means as the coverage can vary greatly from carrier to carrier. So if you are driving for one of the new or existing Ride sharing companies it is important to know your personal auto coverage well. If Ride sharing is not covered at all, you really should take action. Either by seeing if a commercial policy is available with your current insurance company that would cover Ride sharing (not all carriers do) or by shopping for a new personal or commercial auto policy that will cover these operations.

 

Limits, limits limits….

As insurance agents we preach that the state minimum limits are very risky for your personal auto policy. In states like Missouri the state minimum liability limits are $25,000 for bodily injury, $50,000 for total bodily injury and $10,000 for total property damage. Think about the last time you went to the doctor with anything serious. It’s not far fetched to say these types of limits are not hard to meet in any serious vehicle accident. Consider if you were to have a paying customer in the car or possibly multiple. Many articles are pointing out the coverage gaps that Ride sharing brings about. This is important, however the limits of your policy are something that need to be addressed even if your insurance carrier says they will cover the claim. The coverage doesn’t matter as much if the limit of the coverage is too small to cover the claims.

For example; say you were to get into an accident which caused injuries to the another person which resulted in bodily injury claims of $90,000. If you have state minimum limits in Missouri with $25,000 in bodily injury liability per person this means $65,000 of the damages are not covered by your insurance and that goes back to you personally. Forget about mortgage, student loans and all other bills, that is a big hit that leaves nothing for you to show for it. If you had spent a little more on your auto insurance policy and had limits that were more acceptable, your insurance could cover this.

The amount an agent would recommend for auto insurance is going to vary on your individual circumstances and risk. Generally most recommended commercial auto policies have limits of at least $1 Million combined single limit. This allows a sufficient baseline of liability limits to make sure your covered claims are covered to the amount you would need them to be. The minimum limits we would typically recommend for a personal auto policy are around $100,000 bodily injury for each person, $300,000 for bodily injury liability for each accident and $100,000 Property Damage Liability. If you add the Ride-Share exposure, increasing those limits to at least $500,000 or $1 Million individually or combined single limit is better to make sure your protected for the full amount you need. This does cost a little more in premium. However, if a claim occurs the premium difference is the last thing you are going to worry about. Especially if your limits are less than the cost of the accident.

What is Workers’ Compensation Insurance?

Workers’ Compensation Insurance is a state mandated insurance coverage required by nearly every state in the country. The basic purpose of Workers’ Compensation Insurance is to assure injured workers get medical care and compensation for a portion of the income they lose while they are unable to work as a result of injuries sustained on the job.  Workers give up the right to sue employers for injuries that occur as a part of normal business practices. Inured workers can sue employers if there is some form of negligence on the part of the employer.

Workers' Compensation

Workers receive these benefits regardless of who was at fault in the accident. In most cases if a worker is killed while working, workers comp (as it is often abbreviated) provides death benefits for the worker’s dependents. Also, Workers’ Compensation Coverage prevents the employer from bearing the full cost of injuries that occur during normal business operations. Employers also gain the relief that they cannot be sued for injuries that occur as a part of normal business practices.

In the United States, Workers’ Compensation Laws were implemented throughout the first half of the 20th century.  In 1908 President Taft signed the first legislation requiring mandatory employer coverage for employees working in multi-state commerce. Over the next 40 years each state enacted their own state specific workers’ compensation programs. Wisconsin was the first state to adopt such legislation and Mississippi was the last state to adopt a formal workers’ compensation program.

Workers' Compensation Insurance Claim Form

One of the most important legal concepts with regards to workers’ compensation insurance is that it is the “exclusive remedy” when an employee is injured on the job.  This means that employers who purchase coverage  can not be held liable for employee injuries in most states, except under narrow circumstances where the employer intended to cause injury to the employee or was willfully negligent. The idea behind the exclusive remedy clause is to force compromise between employers and employees. Employees give up the ability to to win large suits against employers in order to receive fast and limited financial return. Employers exchange liability regardless of fault, for legal protection from potentially devastating tort judgments in court.

In most states, employers are legally required to carry this insurance coverage. Each state has certain exemptions to the requirement. Two states (Oklahoma and Texas) have laws that allow certain employers to opt-out of the workers’ compensation requirement, if they qualify. Tennessee and South Carolina Legislatures are also proposing similar opt-out provision’s. This opt-out provision has been in the news a bit as of late. Oklahoma is in its second year of allowing companies to opt-out and fewer than thirty businesses have applied for and been granted the privilege.  Unlike Texas’s system, Oklahoma employers must meet certain financial and other requirements to qualify, including a written benefit plan that provides coverage and benefit levels that meet or exceed the minimum requirements set forth in the law.

Most states and employers are taking a wait and see approach to these changes to the opt-out provision.

 

 

What is Pay as You Go Workers’ Compensation?

Pay as You Go Workers’ Compensation Insurance is a fairly new program that is designed to help business owner’s free up cash so they can pay their insurance premium’s monthly instead of in one lump sum. Pay as You Go Workers’ Compensation benefits employers in three main ways:

  1. Pay as You Go Workers Compensation Insurance allows businesses to pay their premium monthly instead of in one large payment.
  2. Pay as You Go frees up cash flow for more immediate business needs.
  3. Pay as You Go prevents audits because both payroll and premiums are calculated monthly instead of yearly.

My Insurance Question can help you pick out the best Pay as You Go Workers' Compensation Insurance Policy.

Pay as You Go Workers’ Compensation Insurance Coverage benefits businesses by allowing them to pay their insurance premium’s monthly based on the payroll of their workforce that month only. This is a great option for industries like construction, farming or landscaping. These industries sometimes have a hard time forecasting payroll because of the weather and many other factors. If your business deals with these types of issues than Pay Go may be a great option for you and your business.

 

Another benefit of Pay as You Go Workers’ Compensation Insurance is that it frees up cash flow for more immediate business needs. With a traditional Workers Comp policy typically twenty five percent of the premium is due all at once. The rest is usually paid in nine monthly payments. This means the business is spending money on insurance immediately that could be used on other more urgent business needs.

Pay as You Go Workers' Compensation Insurance

Finally, business owner’s benefit from Pay Go Workers’ Compensation Coverage because it prevents audits from happening more frequently. An end of term audit still happens, but Pay Go prevents audits from happening more frequently and makes the difference owed much smaller. With the monthly payment format there is less risk of over or underpaying the premium.

Should you Price Check a Flat Renewal Quote?

In meeting with carrier representatives frequently, I always get updates on the marketplace from a broad array of perspectives. Recently, one of the common themes in the current marketplace is that many renewal quotes are a similar price to what they were in the last year. However, carriers are often pricing quotes for new business to that carrier at very low rates in an attempt to win additional business in a flat market.

For example, as I was price checking my upcoming renewal accounts recently, I was able to save one client around 20% on their policy even though their renewal quote with their carrier had not changed from the prior year. By having their renewal policy price checked, this client saved 20%. It’s not to say you should move your business insurance every year as there are advantages to having continuity with one carrier in case claims or service issues arise. However, potential savings can exist even if your renewal pricing is the same as last year’s pricing.

The current marketplace has several carriers notably pricing aggressively to compete for new business opportunities. One of the carriers that comes to mind right away for workers’ compensation insurance is The Hartford. They are discounting their base rates up to 40% for certain business types and in certain states. It is a hard to beat combination when an A rated carrier with excellent customer service is pricing as low as any carrier in the marketplace for certain businesses.

Another carrier that comes to mind is GUARD Insurance. They are another A rated carrier that is affiliated with insurance giant, Berkshire Hathaway. GUARD has been rapidly expanding into the marketplace for small and mid-sized businesses. If you haven’t shopped your business insurance in a few years, GUARD may not have been an available option at the time you decided on a carrier. Now, they are the leading carrier for many industries (particularly certain artisan contractors) in the marketplace and also offer excellent customer service.

There are so many variables that it is hard to write generally about some of the best carriers in the marketplace for particular businesses. However, AmTrust, Employers, FirstComp and Travelers are all highly rated carriers which offer great customer service and are pricing certain industries very aggressively to attempt to grow their business.

There can be other reasons that it may make sense to price check your business insurance. For one, your claims history may be more favorable than it was several years ago.   Other insurance carriers may offer more favorable payment plans than you currently have. An example in the workers compensation arena is that pay as you go insurance might be available. Over time, different carriers happen to prefer certain industries more or less than they do at other times. That can lead to better pricing in some cases than may have been available at different points in time.

Without checking prices, it’s hard to know whether or not there might be better options out there than your current carrier.

Deductibles, Self Insurance and First Dollar Coverage?

Deductibles, Self Insurance and First Dollar Coverage?What is the best option?

When it comes to buying insurance there are a lot of decisions to make which can make the process a bit overwhelming for most. Insurance, like most purchases we make is a decision that has a variety of options to consider. For most of us this decision is based on a three things; Price, Coverage and Service. Is there more to the equation though?

Workers compensation in particular tends to be written on what we call “first dollar Coverage”. This means there is no deductible option and when a claim is filed the insurance carrier will pay claims without you having to first pay a portion before their on the hook. This is a nice policy to have as you don’t have to worry about funding a claim if that takes place, however depending on your premium amount and claims history you could be leaving a lot of money on the table with this option.

Generally when the premium is below $100,000 the benefits of a deductible are slim compared to the discounts offered by most carriers. However, if you have a a competitive market company who offers a quote compared to the fund this option might be worth considering. The savings could be much greater, so you don’t want to rule them out.

When a company starts paying in excess of $100,000 in premium per year this is when considering a high deductible option could be beneficial. This is mostly because that business will typically have an established insurance history and more opportunity to spread out risk. This allows for a better chances of savings. This is where a high deductible option can sometimes save you 20-30% off your premium, but this comes with the risk of you paying out more if claims develop frequently. Examples of the types of deductible plans would be an Aggregate deductible. This is where you pay the claims until the aggregate amount (Typically starting between 50-100k) then the insurance carrier picks up the tab there after.

The opportunity for savings in this business gets bigger and more creative as your premium grows. Once you are paying in excess of $250,000 per year in workers compensation premium you really need to consider alternative options besides first dollar coverage. The only exception is if you have uncontrollable claims history that cannot be corrected. If that is the case than this is a serious issue. This issue needs focus before considering alternative workers comp plans. If you’re not in this boat considering high deductible options are still an opportunity but the savings are not the best. At this point, self insurance is starting to sound appealing. The cash flow that gets tied up in claims reserves can be significant even though the savings can be great. The rewards are likely 5-7 years out. At this premium amount a Captive Self Insured Retro Plan is a great option for a company at this premium threshold or higher with the ability to control their claims. The best part about this plan is it essentially takes the rates out of the equation.

The Captive Self-insured Retro Plan Model we use at our agency is a 3-year plan. Many like this option because it locks in workers comp rates over a 3-year term. Since this is a retro plan, instead of having 1 set premium based on your payrolls, you will have a minimum and a maximum premium. This will change based on your claims development over the 3-year term. The minimum amount accounts for administrative costs for running an insurance company and having the claims handling in place. This plan can often offer premium savings in excess of 50% compared to first dollar coverage policies, if you perform well. The max premium will account for these same costs but give you a worst case scenario if claims get out of control. This allows for a conservative approach to managing risk while allowing the opportunity for maximized savings.

There are several variables to consider when selecting the best plan for your company. The Retro captive program I described is a good solution to consider for your company for the long term. If you would like to know more about it, any insurance agent should be able to discuss these options for your companies future and premium savings.

What do I need for a Work Comp and GL Quote?

Items needed to get a quote on Workers’ Comp and General Liability Insurance

Many times while talking to a prospect and gathering information I get the question “why do you need that, I just need a quote”.  Agents can usually give you a business owner a phone indication depending on the state you are calling in reference to, but that is only an indication and not a formal quote. Any agent can easily go into detail about why they need an address and Employer Identification Number (EIN). Sometimes the business owner on the other end of the phone does not want to give out the information.  At that point an agent has to say, unfortunately I cannot get you a quote unless I have your EIN and other needed information. This is a good piece of information to have if you are looking for a quote on workers’ compensation or general liability insurance for the first time. Below are all the basic questions any agent will ask while on a phone quote. These are also the questions you will get frequently via email when an agent needs more information on a submission sent in to me.

 

  1. It is very important that we have the correct name and spelling of the company. The way the company is formed is also crucial for Officer & Partner Exclusion Regulations per state.
  2. Phone numbers and email addresses are very important for the agent working on your quote and the future insurance carrier. Many carriers require agents to enter an email address upon quoting and or binding an account.  This is typically for billing and information delivery.
  3. Mailing and physical addresses: Many times this is a PO Box for a mailing address and that is acceptable.  However, a physical address is needed for the application and auditing purposes. In some cases there are multiple states and different mailing addresses. Your agent will need to know where to mail important policy information. Which address it needs to go to needs to be specified.
  4. Years in business: If you have been in business 5 years but are just now needing work comp or liability insurance our insurance carriers are going to want to know why. If you are a new venture and hiring employees for the first time, agents have different options for you than a business that has been in operation with employees and no workers comp coverage. All of this needs to be known to get an accurate quote.
  5. Federal or Employer Identification Number:  This number is very important for many reasons. This number acts as the Social Security Number for your business. This number also acts as a way for each agency or agent to identify they are working on your account specifically. For instance if you call four different agents and they all have the same insurance carrier appointments then it’s first come first serve. Meaning the agent that enters in your information first will have the ability to present the quote. The other agents will be “Blocked” from the market. This EIN will also follow you with the National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI). This will show what class codes you have used in the past as well as any past audits out for your company. On a side note please give any and all information to your agent. If an agent asks if you have ever had a Work Comp policy and you say no never, the carrier will have record that you have had a policy before. This makes for a very uncomfortable conversation for all involved.
  6. Officer and owner information: I cannot convey in words how important or vital this piece of information is. Depending on the state and how your company is formed determines what officers/ partners & percentage owned will allow some exclusions. I have seen this go many different ways and usually the head ache could have been detoured with correct owner information.
  7. What are the estimated annual wages for each department (office, field, sales): Workers’ Compensation Rates are based solely on Payroll. Your payroll times the rate of the class of business per 100 in payroll. We as agents understand that if you are just starting out this can be a hard number to decide on. Take it with small numbers first for instance how much money per hour?, how many hours a week?, and how many weeks will the employee be working for you? This number will give you a real number that you can give the agent to quote with.
  8. Detailed description of operations: Agents need to understand what your business is doing on a day-to-day basis. Telling your insurance agent I have a construction business does not give us a lot to go on. What kind of construction? Commercial or residential, new build or existing? Are you an artisan contractor? Or maybe you own a machine shop. What are you machining? All of the questions we are asking are so we can get you the most accurate quote.
  9. If you have a Workers Comp policy in place, agents are going to need a copy of your Loss Runs or Claims history along with an Experience Modification Number (if you qualify for one). You can obtain both of these documents from your current carrier and you do not have to call your agent if you do not want to.  Along with this information if needed a supplemental application will be sent to you to be filled out, signed and returned.

 

Always remember insurance agents are here to help you get the coverage you need. If at any point, do not be afraid to ask questions. Many times this is the first time making a call to inquire about work comp insurance and there is a lot to know before actually purchasing a work comp policy.