Business Personal Property and Tools

Any time you have a business personal property policy in place which covers property of any kind, it is essential to have good documentation of what you have. It is also critical that your insurance policies are covering the right amount of property and type of property the way you want it covered.

It is too easy when you get around to your year end renewal on your business owners package (If it has the Tools & Equipment Coverage or BPP Coverage on it) or your Inland Marine or Property policies, to just renew and not take a close look at what is actually covered.

I have worked with several companies, which, when we reviewed their tools and equipment or Business Personal Property coverage of their prior policies, the limits were not at where they needed to be. This happens for a variety of reasons. I have seen some companies who see a lot of growth in their first few years in business. After a year or two goes by, they don’t realize how much stuff they have accumulated, which ends up being worth a lot of money but not covered by their policy. So this is something we try to stress when you get your first policy, however it is something to make sure is updated as your company grows as well.

Employer’s Liability Coverage Explained

Most business owners are familiar with workers’ compensation insurance. However, many do not know that it almost always comes in two parts. There is workers’ compensation coverage and employer’s liability coverage. Workers’ compensation coverage has unlimited benefits for covered claims where as employer’s liability insurance has limits to its benefits. Employer’s liability insurance protects employers from claims caused by workplace conditions or practices which are not covered by workers’ compensation coverage.

Employer’s liability claims are very rare. However, they can occur and are often costly when they occur. Employer’s liability coverage can cover damages/judgments, settlements, legal defense fees and other court costs. Increased employer’s liability limits generally only increase the cost of the workers’ compensation insurance policy by around 1%.

The most common types of employer’s liability limits are as follows:

(1) Third party claims: these are generally claims brought by an injured employee against a manufacturer of the object causing the employee’s injury. The manufacturer then brings a claim against the employer for contributory negligence.

(2) Dual capacity claims: This is similar to the above, but it comes up when the employer is also a manufacturer. If an employee is injured by a defective product manufactured by his or her employer, he or she might bring a product liability claim against the employer in addition to claiming workers’ compensation benefits.

(3) Loss of consortium or other services to family members: loss of consortium and other claims such as modifications to homes or lost parental services resulting from a workplace injury can be covered.

(4) Consequential bodily injury: claims by the spouse or other family members of an injured employee arising from the injury such as a heart attack due to the stress of the news of the employee injury.

(5) Intentional acts/torts by the employer: claims covered in some jurisdictions such as knowingly allowing employees to work in unsafe workplace conditions.