Accounting Firms

Businesses in the accounting industry have unique risks that only they face. For this reason, you need to partner with an insurance agent who is comfortable working with businesses in this industry. Slips, trips, and falls do not cause a large problem to this industry because the employees do not move around a lot and there is limited interaction with the public.  Repetitive injury like carpal tunnel and back problems can arise from long periods of time sitting at a desk.

Accounting

Bigger risk arise from the fact that you are interacting with individuals and businesses private sensitive financial documents. These risks are typically low in frequency, but can most definitely be severe if the wrong information falls into the wrong hands. Additional risks arise from the fact that accounting businesses are providing professional advice and services. Because of the enormous amount of risk in all of these areas of the business, it is important to get an all encompassing insurance package. Consulting with an experienced independent insurance agent is always the best way to know for sure you are getting the most comprehensive coverage at rock bottom prices.  Here are TKTK Insurance policies all accounting services firms should strongly consider.

 

Coverages Recommended for Accounting Professionals:

✓ General Liability Insurance
✓ Professional Liability Insurance (E&O)
✓ Hired and Non-Owned Auto
✓ Workers Compensation Insurance
✓ Employee Dishonesty Bond

General Liability Insurance

In most states, this coverage is required by law to be in business. For this reason, most business owners start with this coverage and workers compensation insurance.  The risk of a General Liability claim is minimal since most operations are not conducted on the businesses property and most of the client contact is electronic or by mail. When clients do visit the office, they should be kept separate from the main office area in an attempt to prevent them from hearing conversations regarding other clients’ confidential information. Off-premises exposures arise when employees are engaged in sales visits, training sessions, and physical audits at the customer’s premises. There should be policies and training as to off-site conduct by employees.

Professional Liability Coverage

 

The risk factors accounting services businesses face in relation to Professional Liability Coverage include the services the business provides, the firm’s credentials, the employees experience as well as the ratio of professional to clerical employees. Failure to conduct thorough background checks to verify credentials and education can pose a significant risk. In some circumstances it can cause a claim not to be covered. The risk of E&O claims increase if clerical workers are allowed to do tasks that only the professionals should handle and if error checking procedures are inadequate. Most carriers have plans in place for you to follow if you do not already have such plans in place.

Hired and Non-Owned Auto Insurance

Risks associated with automobiles are generally limited to hired and non-owned auto insurance. This is because most accounting businesses do not have a need to buy vehicles specifically for business purposes. However, many employees probably do use their personal vehicles for business purposes to visit clients facilities. In these situations, there should be clear procedures in place regarding personal use by employees and their family members. The age, training, experience, and records of each driver, as well as age, condition, and maintenance of the vehicles, are all important items to consider if your business needs a commercial auto policy.

Workers Compensation Coverage

Workers compensation is a form of liability insurance required for employers in 48 out of 50 states. This type of insurance compensates injured workers for lost wages and medical costs while giving business owners the peace of mind to know they will not be sued for accidents that occur as part of normal operating procedures. Accounting firms don’t typically have a hard time finding affordable workers compensation coverage because of the light physical duty of the industry.  Repetitive injuries like carpal tunnel are the most severe type of risk employees face.  Offering adequate chairs and even desk that allow employees to stand for part of the day are a worthy investment.

Employee Dishonesty Bond

There are two main types of criminal insurance related to employee dishonesty. The two types of coverage that a business can purchase to prevent losses related to the criminal activity committed by your employees are Commercial Crime Insurance and a Fidelity Bond.  A Fidelity Bond is a form of insurance that covers losses resulting from employee dishonesty. This can help cover any lost money or securities that result from an employee’s dishonest acts. A Fidelity Bond is meant to act as a security against potential fraudulent employees or disgruntled employees.  A Commercial Crime Insurance Policy is typically designed to meet the needs of organizations other than financial institutions (such as banks). A commercial crime policy typically provides several different types of crime coverage like: employee dishonesty, forgery, computer fraud, funds transfer fraud, kidnap, etc. Both of these policies will cover losses due to the actions of your employees. If you are not sure which type is best for you it is always best to consult with an experienced independent insurance agent to make sure you are properly covered.

 

Class Codes ASSOCIATED WITH THE ACCOUNTING INDUSTRY

Business Liability Category: Service Businesses

SIC Business Insurance Codes:

  • 8721: Accounting, Auditing and Bookkeeping Services
  • 7291: Tax Return Preparation Services

NAICS Liability Classifications:

  • 541211: Offices of Certified Public Accountants
  • 541213: Tax Preparation Services
  • 541214: Payroll Services
  • 541219: Other Accounting Services

Business ISO General Liability:

  • 41677: Accounting/Consulting

Common Workers Compensation Class Codes:

  • 8803: Accountant, Auditor; traveling
  • 8810: Clerical; office only

Golf Courses

My Insurance Question - Golf Courses

5 Types of Insurance Coverage all Golf Courses Need

The industry surrounding Golf Courses is a diverse industry. Some of the businesses serve very high end customers and professional tournaments. Other courses serve people with middle-class incomes in a rural setting. Some of the businesses do not have a full course and only offer a driving range putting green. Most of the businesses offer some form of lessons, food and beverage as well as retail offerings. Depending upon which type of golf course you own or operate, the type of insurance coverage you need may vary dramatically. Here are five coverages most golf courses need.

  • General Liability
  • Liquor Liability
  • Commercial Property
  • Hired and Non-Owned Auto
  • Workers Compensation

Golf Courses

General Liability Insurance

General Liability Insurance risks can be substantial due to both the number of visitors and the nature of the activity. Golf is a physical endeavor and not everyone who partakes in the activity is of the highest athletic ability, nor are many in the best physical condition. The safety of the customers is a major concern. Slips, trips, and falls are always are a concern; as are flying golf balls. Golf carts can overturn and that may cause additional risks. If you have employees that are interacting with children, it is important to conduct proper background checks on those employees.

Liquor Liability

Liquor Liability Insurance is commonly referred to as dramshop liability. Most golf courses sell and serve some types of alcohol and in most states this requires them to purchase some form of liquor liability insurance. There are many types of risks associated with alcohol use at a golf course. Those risks include selling to an intoxicated customer, contributing to the over-intoxication of a customer and serving alcohol to a minor. These and many other risks associated to alcohol consumption make liquor liability a necessary coverage for golf courses.

Commercial Property Insurance

Commercial Property Insurance Exposure might be minimal if limited to a clubhouse facility or a maintenance shed, but not all golf courses are this simple. Many golf courses offer retail, food and beverage, restaurant facilities and instruction.  Many golf courses are located in remote areas. These locations add additional risks due to fires and how quick first responders can get to injured employees or customers.

Hired and Non-Owned Auto

If your business owns the vehicles employees are operating as part of their work, a commercial auto policy is necessary. Hired and Non-Owned Auto Liability Exposure is generally limited to employees using their own vehicle for running errands or when an employee is travelling for work and using a rented vehicle. If your employees partake in any of these actions your business needs Hired and Non-Owned Auto Insurance.

Workers Compensation Insurance

Workers Compensation Insurance Risks can be high for golf courses. If the golf course has employees who do its own grounds maintenance and chemical applications, it can cause the amount of injuries to rise. Other employees face normal slips, falls, strains, sprains and being hit by errant golf balls or equipment.

Golf Courses Insurance Needs

Painters

Painters or painting, staining and decorating contractors fill a great role within the construction industry. As the economy continues to recover the need for painters continues to grow. With the growth in this industry comes an increase in risk and a need for more insurance coverage. The risks in this industry are much different than if you run an auto repair shop or an HVAC company.

There are certain types of information you will need for a general liability and workers compensation quote. Here are 5 policies every painting contractor needs to secure in order to completely cover them and their employees.

Find the best info about insurance coverage for painters at My Insurance Question.

 

General Liability

General liability insurance is normally the first coverage any small business purchases. This is no different for a painting contractor. In most states this coverage is required by law to be in business. General Liability coverage will cover your liability to third parties for accidents that occur as a part of normal business operations. For painting contractors who work at remote locations, it is important to speak with your independent insurance agent about what exactly is and is not covered when you are operating on the premises of a third party. If you interact with a general contractor who has many contractors operating at one location it is important for you to make sure all of the other contractors have the proper insurance required for the work taking place.

Inland Marine Coverage

Inland marine coverage will cover any specialized equipment you or your employees use as part of your daily operations. This is an important coverage to secure, especially if you have expensive specialized equipment, because most basic policies will not cover this equipment when it is damaged. For instance if you have a van or a vehicle with a trailer carrying extra tools, when a wreck occurs your commercial insurance policy will cover your liability to the other person hurt in the accident and to fix your vehicle, but it will not pay to cover your specialized equipment. This is a coverage your agent can help you determine if you need it or not. Depending upon how much the equipment costs, you may be able to do without this coverage.

Commercial Property Insurance

Commercial property insurance is different from your personal home owners insurance policy. It is different primarily because it is sold one of two ways: Replacement cost or on an agreed upon value of the property. It may be tempting to go with an agreed upon value to save on premium, but this is almost always a mistake. This is because the agreed upon value is usually what the property is appraised at currently. This amount does not include the cost to tear down the dwelling and remove all the debris after a disaster occurs. This additional cost can be extensive.

Commercial Auto Insurance

Commercial auto insurance is also different from a personal auto policy. Commercial auto can be purchased for vehicles your business owns, but it can also be purchased for employees who drive their own vehicles or rented vehicles while on the job. This type of policy is called hired and non-owned auto coverage. Again, with this coverage it is important to take some additional time to speak with your agent about the daily operations of your business. If you are honest with them about what you do on a daily basis they can do their best to prevent occurrences from taking place where your business or your vehicles are not covered.

Workers’ Compensation

Workers compensation insurance is the second coverage a business purchases because like general liability insurance it is required by law in most states. Workers compensation is like general liability, but it applies only to your employees and not to third parties. If your employees are injured at work as a part of what would be deemed normal business operations, workers compensation coverage will pay them for some of their lost wages (typically 60%) and medical expenses. Depending upon the state in which you operate in and the accident occurs, there are time limits on how long the employee can collect workers compensation benefits. Having adequate safety programs and a strong return to work program will help your business from experiencing excessive damage to your experience modification rating.

 

Here at My Insurance Question you can find the best advice on the insurance policies all painters need.

Recommended Insurance Programs for Painters

Minimum recommended coverage:

•   General Liability

•   Inland Marine Coverage

•   Property Insurance

•   Commercial Auto Insurance

•   Workers’ Compensation

Other coverages to consider for Painters:
Business Personal Property, Employee Dishonesty, Contractors’ Equipment (Inland Marine), Umbrella Liability, Commercial Auto Liability, Goods in Transit, Environmental Impairment Liability, Stop Gap Liability and Employment Practices Liability Insurance (EPLI).

Rental Property Insurance

When you own rental property with it comes a certain amount of risk. There are ways to lessen the amount of risk your or your business faces by properly preparing your business and purchasing adequate insurance coverage.  Here are 3 types of insurance you or your business need to secure when you own rental property.

If you own Rental Property, you need to determine what kinds of insurance your business actually needs?

 

If you or your business own rental property, there are certain insurance coverages you need to secure. Find out the best info at My Insurance Question.com

Three Policies every rental property owner should have. 

General Liability Coverage

General Liability Insurance in most cases is the first type of insurance a business or investor purchases. General Liability and Workers’ Compensation Coverage are required by law in 48 out of 50 states. For this reason, most business owners start with these two coverages and later determine if they need additional insurance.  GL Insurance covers a property owner for any liability they might face to thirds parties.  Some liabilities you may face include when a tenant or visitor are injured due to the landlord’s negligence, when a property maintenance issue results in a tenants’ injury or personal property loss or when a tenant is injured as a result of the landlord’s failure to keep the premises safe and in good working order.  Now these are just a couple of the types of liability a property owner may face.  Other risks you or your business face include losses due to fire, storm, tenant or employee theft and even discrimination lawsuits filed by tenants or employees. A lawsuit does not have to be legitimate to cause you or your business to incur enormous legal costs. Having the proper insurance in place can limit the damages to you or your business if you do face a lawsuit.

Commercial Property Insurance

Commercial Property Insurance is frequently the second coverage a property owner will secure.  When looking to acquire a commercial insurance policy it is important to secure an accurate valuation of the property. A Commercial Property Insurance Policy are just a little bit different than a personal home owners policy in that they are sold on either a replacement cost or on an agreed upon value. For most businesses the replacement cost policy is almost always the best type of policy to secure. This type of policy will pay to not only rebuild the property but also to demolish and haul away any and all debris. This additional cost can be substantial.

Business Loss of Income

Business Loss of Income Coverage is the third and final type of insurance all rental property owners should purchase. A business loss of income insurance policy will cover you or your business for the income lost during the period when a rental property is uninhabitable.  For example, if your building is damaged by a hurricane; this coverage kicks in to cover missed rent payments you or your business would have collected while the property is being repaired. Frequently this coverage is paid based upon documented actual revenue, which is good for property owners because you have a lease stating how much revenue the property generates.  Depending upon the policy you can collect payments for lost rent for up to 12 months after a loss.

 

3 Benefits of a Business Owner’s Policy.

What is a BOP?  If you work in insurance long enough, this becomes a question you receive quite frequently.  Many small businesses shop their policy around themselves to many different insurance companies. This can save those businesses some money, but it does come at the expense of the business owner’s precious time. Most insurance companies attempt to remedy this problem by offering a Business Owner’s Policy (BOP).

Find the answers to your questions about a Business Owner's Policy at My Insurance Question.com

A Business Owner’s Policy is an insurance package designed for businesses in a particular industry. These packages can be adjusted to fit the needs of each individual business, but they most commonly come in packages specific to each industry.  Over time, insurance companies have found certain coverages are needed by all businesses in a particular industry.  Because they have a unique insight in to the loss history of many businesses in that particular industry they tend to recommend a certain package of policies for that industry.  By offering a business owner’s policy, insurance companies can make sure there are no gaps in coverage.  At the same time they can make sure the business is not carrying too much or unnecessary coverage. Carrying a BOP benefits a business owner in three main ways.

Pricing

Pricing is one of the first aspects that attract business owner’s to choosing a BOP.  Insurance carriers are more likely to give businesses a discount if they know they are going to sell a business multiple policies. Business Owners can do the shopping for themselves, but they have to spend time searching for better coverage and price instead of working on their business. With the help of a good independent insurance agent, a business owner can allow the agent to shop the policy around to many insurance carriers. This allows the agent to negotiate the best price and the most complete coverage. For this reason, it is important to choose an insurance agent who has relationships with many insurance providers, not just a select few. Many agencies work exclusively with just a few carriers and this does not allow the agent to shop around your policy if you are in a tough classification code or have a negative claims history.

No gaps in coverage

Another great reason to consider a BOP is to ensure there are no gaps in coverage. Shopping for your policies individually might save a business a few bucks on the front end, but it be very detrimental to your business when a claim occurs.  This is a portion of the insurance industry where a few grey areas occur. When an incident occurs and a business has policy from many different carriers, at best they business will have to wait additional time while the carriers determine who is liable for the claim.  At worst, having several different carriers can cause the claim to not be covered at all.  On the contrary, if the policies are all with one carrier, the underwriter will just determine which policy needs to kick in and then processes the claim.  This is because, if you have a BOP with just one carrier typically there is General Liability, Professional Liability and an Umbrella policy. In this case the insurance company just determines which policy is in effect and processes your claim. When every policy is carried with one insurance carrier, that carrier can ensure there are no gaps in your policy.

Certificates

The final way businesses benefit from carrying a Business Owner’s Policy is when there is a need for a certificate. This occurs when businesses are involved in projects they are contracted on. Many artisan contractors do work for several general contractors. Take an electrician as an example. For each general contractor an electrician does a project for they need a certificate proving insurance coverage. If each coverage is with a different carrier that is an additional call the electrician has to make. If that electrician has a BOP they call one agent and can get a certificate for all of their policies.

These are three of the many benefits business owners get when they go with a Business Owner’s Policy. BOP’s are a win-win situation because the insurance company benefits from more business while the business owner benefits from having better service, more complete coverage and usually a better price. When in need of a business insurance quote it is also important to consult with an insurance agency who partners with many carriers. This will allow their agents to shop the policy to more carriers and ensure your business is getting the best coverage at the absolute lowest rates in the industry.

HVAC Contractors

Heating and Air Conditioning Contractors ( HVAC Contractors ) are those business that provide services for and repair heating and air conditioning units.  They provide these services for both commercial and residential clients.  They have to be knowledgeable about both duct and vent work, the different types of fuel sources for heating equipment, which can be natural or LP gas, electric, steam, solid fuel, coal, or fuel oil.  Many contractors also install, service, and repair air conditioners. While air conditioning units are normally electric-powered, they are charged with different coolants, some of which may be hazardous.

All of these different types of work bring their own unique risks to the contractor. For this reason, it is very important for you to have an extended conversation with your insurance agent about all of the types of work you do and do not participate in.  It is equally important to inform your agent if there are certain types of work you do not partake in. There are more than one classification code for this industry and the types of risks you take on can dramatically impact what you pay in premium for a number of commercial insurance policies.  Below are 6 policies most HVAC Contractors need to secure in order to protect their business properly.

•   General Liability

•   Property Insurance

•   Hired and Non-Owned Auto (full commercial auto if vehicles owned)

•   Inland Marine

•   Business Income with Extra Expense

•   Workers’ Compensation

General Liability Insurance

General Liability Exposures at the contractor’s office or shop are generally limited due to lack of public access to the premises. Retail sales increase the possibility of customers slipping, falling, or tripping if customers visit office to view products.

Property Insurance

Property exposures at the heating contractor’s own location are generally limited to those of an office, shop, and storage of materials, equipment, and vehicles. Operations may also include retail sales. The fire exposure is generally light unless repair operations involving welding take place on premises. Welding involves the use of tanks of gases that must be stored and handled properly to avoid loss. The absence of basic controls such as chained storage in a cool area and the separation of welding from other operations may reflect a greater risk.

Commercial Auto

Automobile exposures are generally limited to transporting workers, equipment and supplies to and from job sites for HVAC Contractors. Hazards depend on the type and use of vehicles and radius of operation with the main hazards being upsets. Vehicles may have special modifications or built-in equipment such as lifts and hoists. Large heating systems may be awkward and require special handling and tie-down procedures. Age, training, experience, and drivers’ records, as well as the age, condition and maintenance of the vehicles are all important items to consider. If employees utilize their own personal vehicles for work related tasks then Hired and Non-Owned Coverage should be purchased.

Inland Marine Coverage

Inland marine exposures include contractors’ tools and equipment, including ladders and scaffolding, hoists, and portable welders, the transport of materials, and installation floater. Goods in transit consists of tools and equipment as well as products purchased by the customer for installation at the job site. HVAC units can be of high value and susceptible to damage in transit; they frequently require expertise in loading to prevent load shift or overturn.

Workers’ compensation

Workers compensation exposures vary based on the size and nature of the job. Both residential and commercial work involves lifting, work with hand tools, wiring, and piping. Cuts from the fabrication and installation of sheet metal for ducts and vents are common. Lifting injuries such as hernias, strains and sprains plus back injuries may occur. Electrical burns are common; electrocution can occur from the use of high-voltage lines. Any time work is done above ground, injury or death from falls and being struck by falling objects can occur. Slips and falls, foreign object in eyes, major and minor burns, and inhalation of fumes are all potential hazards.

Food trucks

How much insurance do owners of food trucks need?????

  • Food Trucks are a booming industry.  In 2015, the industry represented more than 1.2 billion in annual sales. This booming industry has contributed to an annual growth rate of more than 12% over the 5 previous years. Because of this popularity many more business owners entering the market. As they enter the market there are many risks that come to this industry. Many business owners in this industry got their start in the traditional restaurant industry. There are many more risks that come with a restaurant that is mobile and processing many transactions at a remote location. Those risks are much different from a traditional restaurant, a non-profit organization or even a home health care agency. For this reason, food truck owners need to have a strong relationship with an independent insurance agent who can help them properly protect their investment. Here are 5 coverages most food truck owners need to secure, in order to properly protect their business.
  •  •   General Liability

•   Commercial Auto

•   Inland Marine

•   Cyber Insurance

•   Workers Compensation

Food Trucks

    General Liability
    General Liability is the first and most essential coverage a food truck owner will need to secure in order to protect their business. It is required by law in most states depending on the way in which your business is classified and how much revenue you generate.
    Commercial Auto
    A Commercial Auto Policy will be essential to food trucks.  This will cover the main body of the vehicle if it is damaged in an accident.  It will also cover your liability to the other vehicle in the crash if the accident is the fault of you or your employee. A commercial auto insurance policy is not all encompassing.  The equipment kept inside your vehicle or pulled behind a trailer is not covered by a commercial auto policy.  These pieces of equipment will be covered by an inland marine insurance policy.
    Inland Marine
    An Inland Marine Insurance Policy is designed for specialized equipment that is meant to be in transit. The very nature of the food truck industry makes this coverage essential. One key to making sure all of your equipment is covered, is to have a detailed conversation with your independent insurance agent about what types of equipment you have and exactly how you use that equipment.
    Cyber Insurance
    Cyber Insurance is a necessary coverage far too many food truck owners do not realize they need. Even at a mobile workstation like a food truck, a majority of the purchases will be made with a card or mobile device. Depending upon what type of mobile Point of Sale software you use this can open up your business to becoming a victim of a data breach.  If you secure the proper coverage it can help you recover from the damages your business faces as a result of a data breach. The coverage can help you make your customers whole again and it can help you restore the damaged image of your business as a result of a data breach.
    Workers Compensation
    Workers Compensation insurance is required by law in 48 out of 50 states. Each workers compensation system is regulated by the individual states and each states’ system has specific exclusions based on how many employees you have, the revenues of your business and certain industries.  You may not be required to secure this coverage depending upon your specific state. Even if you are not required to secure this coverage it is more than likely beneficial to you to secure this coverage once you hire an employee not in your immediate family.

Find in-depth information about the best insurance for food trucks at MyInsuranceQuestion.com

Florist

I only own a small florist, how much insurance do I really need?

 

Here are 6 insurance coverages every floral business should have.  

How much and what types of insurance coverage a floral business needs really depends on the size, type and scope of your business.  If your business only sells flowers at one location than you may not need all of these coverages, but if your business designs flower arrangements or provides delivery service it opens up your business to an enormous amount of additional risk.  Here are 6 insurance coverage’s all floral businesses should strongly consider securing.

General Liability

General Liability Insurance will protect your business from property damage and bodily injury claims of third parties.  Third parties can be anyone not associated with your business that is harmed by the actions of your businesses operations.  Included in this group of people can be customers, vendors delivering products to your facility or even a plumber who comes to work on your toilet.

Professional Liability

If you are designing floral arrangements for special occasions like weddings, funerals, Valentines Day or Christmas you can be sued if the designs are not up to the expectations of the customer.  The lawsuits do not have to be founded to cost your business immensely in legal fees and reputation management.  This coverage will help your business withstand the costs to defend your self in court and for missed time at work spent defending you and your business.

Commercial Auto/Hired and Non-owned Auto

If your business uses vehicles as a part of normal business operations than you need to secure one or both of these coverages. If the business owns a vehicle and that is the only vehicle used for business purposes than a commercial auto policy should suffice your business, but if you have employees who use their own vehicle or rented vehciles for any part of their job than you need to secure the addition of hired and non-owned auto coverage.

Commercial Property 

A commercial property insurance policy is needed if your business owns and operates any property as a part of your operations, no matter the size. It is different than a traditional home owners policy.  Commercial property policies are sold on a replacement cost or on an actual value basis.  It is usually best to purchase a replacement cost policy.  This type of policy will cover the cost to tear down, haul off and replace the property that is damage.  An actual value policy will pay you an agreed upon value of what the property is worth.  In most cases this will not pay the entire amount to make your business whole again.

Inland Marine 

If you own any specialized equipment or equipment that is designed to be in transport frequently, you have a need for Inland Marine Coverage.  A commercial property will cover your facility.  A commercial auto policy will cover your vehicles.  If you have specialized equipment you use to design and maintain the arrangements or an attachment to your vehicle like a trailer it will not be covered by either of these policies. This is where an inland marine policy can be added to cover this specific equipment. Taking additional time with your agent to explain all the details of your business can make sure you secure all of the policies your business needs.

Workers Compensation

Workers Compensation Insurance is required by law for most businesses in 48 out of 50 states. The system is managed by the individual states, so it is important for you to check with the proper state governing agency to ensure you are compliant with your states laws and regulations. Even if there is an exclusion for your business to not carry the coverage, it is usually in your best interest to still secure workers comp coverage. This insurance policy will protect your business from being sued for most injuries that occur as a part of normal business operations. It also provides medical coverage and reimbursement of some lost wages for workers injured as a part of normal business operations.

Electrical Contractors

Insurance needs and concerns for Electrical Contractors

Electrical contractors carry unique risks that many other businesses in the construction industry do not face.  With those risks come additional types of insurance needs.  Each electrician is unique in the scope and capacity in which they operate their business.  Depending upon the type of work each electrician partakes’ in, there may be a number of types of coverage an electrician needs to secure in order to properly secure their business.  Here is a list of 5 commonly carried coverages most electricians secure.

 

  • General Liability
  • Commercial Property
  • Commercial Auto
  • Inland Marine (Tools and Equipment)
  • Workers Compensation

General Liability

Exposures at the contractor’s office are generally limited because of the lack of access to the premises. Storing materials outdoors may create vandalism and attractive nuisance hazards.  Electrical voltage is always a risk for electricians.  This is due to the risk of electrical burns or electrocution to employees or other third parties.  An electricians’ employees can cause damage to the client’s property and can cause bodily injury to members of the household, the public, or employees of other contractors.  These are risks that are covered by a general liability policy.

Commercial Property

If you own a property; no matter how small, your business needs to secure commercial property coverage. Property exposures at the contractor’s premises typically are fairly low for electricians.  This is generally limited to those of an office and storage for supplies, tools, and vehicles.

Commercial Auto

Automobile liability exposure is higher for electrician than other brick and mortar businesses.  Most electrical contractors are in transit to transport workers, equipment and electrical supplies to and from job sites.  A driving hazard is a huge risk for insurance companies to insure.  The more time your business spends driving the higher the likelihood of claims.  Those claims tend to rise in both frequency and severity.  Implementing a safe driving program and keeping up to date driving records for all employees can help limit what you pay in premium.  Age, training, experience, and drivers’ records, as well as the age, condition, and maintenance of the vehicles, are all important items to consider.

Inland Marine

Inland marine is also commonly called ‘Floaters’ coverage.  It is meant for specialized equipment that is frequently in transit as a part of business operations. The exposures often include owned or rented equipment, building materials, as well as materials being transported to and from the job site.  This is commonly needed for businesses that transport their equipment to a third party site for use delivering a service.  The most basic example of an industry that needs this coverage is a landscaping company.  It can also include any business that takes equipment away from the premises for use as a part of normal business operations.

Workers’ Compensation

Workers compensation insurance is required by law in 48 out of 50 states.  Each state has their own specific exclusions depending upon the number of employees and the scope of your work.  It is important to check with the proper governing agency in your state to determine if you are required to purchase this coverage. Even if you are not required to purchase this coverage in many cases it is still beneficial to your business to secure it.  The coverage provides you with protection from lawsuits that may result from injured employees who are injured as a result of normal business practices.  Employees give up the ability to sue for normal injuries, but get back coverage for their medical expenses and some portion of their wages while they are hurt and not able to work.  Typically they are reimbursed 60 percent of their normal wages for the time they are not able to work.

 

Real Estate Insurance Needs

5 Types of insurance every Real Estate Agency should have.

 

Real Estate Agencies take on a unique set of risks compared to other traditional businesses.  Many businesses, like a restaurant for example, have a brick and mortar location where a majority or all of the business takes place.  Real Estate Agencies, while most do have a physical address, have a majority of their work taking place at a third party location.  These locations frequently are at the property they are helping to sell.  For this reason, real estates agencies have to secure a unique group of coverages in order to adequately protect their business. Here are 5 recommended coverages most real estate agencies should secure.

 

  •    General Liability Coverage
  •    Errors and Omissions (Professional Liability)
  •    Property Insurance
  •    Hired and Non-Owned Auto
  •    Workers’ Compensation Insurance

 

General Liability Insurance

For most real estate agencies, the risks related to general liability coverage are often minimal.  This is primarily due to not much business occurring at the physical location.  A majority of their work is done over the phone, by electronic mail or at a third party location. Off-Premises risks can be extensive for this industry. That is true whether you are dealing with the selling of properties or rental properties.  These risks typically arise from sales visits, inspections, open-houses and similar work done at the customers’ home or other buildings.  In some cases, there is an agent representing both the buyer and the seller.  Any damage that occurs during joint operations, like an open-house, can cause a dispute between all parties involved. Monitoring of keys is another risk that must be dealt with carefully.  Documenting every time, you access a facility is highly recommended to limit the risk you face regarding access to the facility.

Errors and Omissions Coverage (Professional Liability)

Exposure associated with errors and omissions (E&O) may be the most significant risk a real estate agency faces.  This is because a majority of the work you do is highly specialized and you are giving advice.  If you give the wrong advice, it can cause the business to be liable to the client in the future. To limit these risks the agency can make sure all employees have the proper credentials, experience and has the proper ratio of professional employees to clerical employees. Thorough background checks are essential to limit E&O Claims.

Commercial Property Insurance

If your agency owns physical property, you need to secure Commercial Property Insurance.  There are two ways these policies are sold.  They are sold on a replacement base or on an agreed upon value of the property.  In most cases, it is better to secure a policy at replacement level.  This will include the cost to tear down the facility, remove all debris and build a new facility.  If your policy is an agreed upon value it typically does not include these additional costs.

Commercial Auto/Hired and Non-Owned Auto Coverage

If you own vehicles for your employees to use when they are away from the office than you need to secure a Commercial Auto Policy.  Most real estate agencies do not own vehicles specifically for company use, but they do have agents who use their personal cars for business purposes.  When these employees are using their personal vehicles for business purposes the business is liable for any accidents that may occur.  The business is not liable for the damage to the employee’s car. This is covered by the employee’s personal auto insurance policy.  The business is liable for damage to the car and any bodily injuries that may occur to third parties.  A Hired and Non-Owned Auto Insurance Policy will take care of most liability a business faces resulting from accidents that occur when employees drive their personal cars or rented vehicles for business purposes.

 

Workers’ Compensation Coverage

Workers’ Compensation Insurance is required by law in 48 out of 50 states.  Each state has their own rules and regulations regarding the administration of this system.  Each state has their own exceptions for some small or family owned businesses.  Workers Comp is similar to general liability, except that it covers employees and not third parties.  When an employee is hurt on the job, work comp coverage will cover some of their lost wages (typically 60%) and medical costs incurred as a result of the injury.